David Wojnarowicz

For outsiders like David Wojnarowicz ― working-class, queer, uneducated and HIV-positive ― good manners and politesse were deadly illusions.
Manhattan's art scene is one that fluctuates and migrates. Watching it over time, it starts to look like a natural process, like herding patterns, or erosion.
One such piece is the Wojnarowicz painting, which was auctioned off circa 1990 at the height of the economic crash. Berman
Vito Russo, the legendary gay and AIDS activist whose achievements have already earned him a biography and several film documentaries, is best known as the author of The Celluloid Closet and as a co-founder of GLAAD (Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation)
The amendment didn't hold. But the Corcoran canceled the show. Mapplethorpe had already died, but his work was censored without
Twenty-five years ago today, the first Day Without Art began as the US art world's national day of action and mourning in response to the AIDS crisis.
I've just finished reading an extraordinary book. It was hard to read the last pages because, as I had a half dozen times already, I was crying. Other people I know have wept repeatedly as they made their way through Cynthia Carr's Fire in the Belly: The Life and Times of David Wojnarowicz.
The confrontation centered around Wojnarowicz has awakened much of contemporary culture to the impact of the gay artist's
Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) was diagnosed for the first time in 1981, and through government inaction and
In my years as a curator of contemporary art, the question I have most frequently been asked is how I make the choices I make, how and why I select the artists that I do.