economic justice

The 50-year-old anti-poverty movement has seen a revival in the era of Trump.
Highlighting workforce disparities is the only way to bring economic justice to the forefront.
Despite this grim reality, the Republican Party's economic policy agenda has not changed for decades. Cut taxes for the 1
In my estimation, this election has never been about the popularity of Donald Trump. For some of his supporters, it has been
A major shift to solar will require PECO to change the way it does business, making solar an infrastructure priority rather
Fifty-three years after Americans were promised equal pay, Black women are still far behind. But it is not too late to make up the difference. Let's move forward from this Labor Day demanding change.
If the candidates make the choice to follow in the Roosevelt's memory, the Nation will be able to heal and grow in infinitely beautiful and powerful ways.
Increasingly, college faculty and campuses (whether in New England or elsewhere in the United States) that the author identifies
We need more Newt Knights today. We need coalitions to combat the pernicious and ominous signs that appear around us this year. We need to work together to fight the newer forms of obvious oppression.
In the past year, we have seen a welcome surge, prodded by new books on slavery, campus debates, and student protests, of new commitments by some universities and other institutions to confront the truth about their own histories, especially the ugly legacies of slavery and Native American genocide.
Hillary Clinton's very impressive New York primary victory over Bernie Sanders points up some of her most significant strengths as a political figure. She generally performs quite well on a big stage. And there are few bigger presidential primary stages than that of New York.
With the passage of the $15 minimum wage, we have proudly rebuked the right-wing ethos that only values extreme wealth, and we are leading our entire nation toward a more just future where hard work is rewarded with fair pay.
What makes Sanders' speech special? There is a remarkable convergence between Sanders' criticism of the rapacity of today's global marketplace and Pope Francis'. This should not in itself be surprising.
There could be no more urgent political or policy agenda. There are two global crises that are increasing exponentially in scale this year, trapped in a vicious reinforcing cycle, one making the other worse.
$10 per hour is just enough for a decent life in Paducah, KY, but $15 per hour will still leave you struggling in the Bay Area.
Rev. Vivian, a Presidential Medal of Freedom winner, a confidant of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and a role model for so many of us in the 1960s era of civil rights activism and still, believes young people today are inheriting the world at a unique crossroads in history.
Bernie Sanders, like Jesus, is inspired to bring good news to the poor. And like Jesus' message, Bernie's message is controversial. Many argue that he is too radical to be president or that his ideals are too lofty. And yet he stands for the root values of American democracy.
Hillary Clinton's stated recently that she will not raise taxes on the middle class. She will raise taxes only on the rich and super rich. But at what income does the middle class end and the rich begin?
If you've watched the Democratic debates (I feel your pain if you've suffered through the rancor of the Republican ones), you've probably noticed something else about Bernie Sanders: he's tough, but he's not a gutter fighter.