fertility clinics

For some in the LGBT community, determining how they can start or even grow their families with the help of fertility experts is a process sometimes fraught with obstacles. I'm happy to say that in my nearly 30 years as a fertility doctor, third-party reproductive options have come a long way.
One of the first choices that all patients have to make is where to seek infertility care. It's a critical decision as practice patterns, treatment strategies, and technology used can vary greatly from one practice to another.
Getting or staying pregnant is not easy for everyone -- for some, it can take time and money. While you might not be thinking of having kids right now, having a conversation with a physician about fertility while still in your early 30s could provide benefit later on.
The Missouri legislature is currently considering the enactment of legislation that would define frozen embryos as human life.
There's a way to help keep your options open as life races forward. Fertility preservation offers women a safe and effective way to freeze or preserve eggs at their current age in order to help maximize their fertility in the future.
ltimately, we're left to wonder what might drive such uneven racial performance in a well-regarded clinic and whether such a disparity in outcomes is commonplace. Said differently, is this the only clinic experiencing a problem or is this the only clinic acknowledging its problem?
About one out of five couples who come to HRC Fertility, a network of fertility clinics in Southern California, doesn’t need
Women like me face Mother's Day with shades of shame, despair and silence. So, I would like to take this opportunity to speak up and share with those who know someone who has infertility or are experiencing it themselves. Here is what I wish someone had told me about about the disease.
Outside of Hollywood, what happens when large groups of donor siblings search and find one another? While incorporating the reality of one or two new family members into your life seems daunting, the possibility of encountering twenty, fifty, one hundred, or even more is probably downright frightening.
Smiling babies. Confusing statistics. Talk of miracles. There is too little oversight of how fertility clinics market themselves
Last summer, I tried to uncover some evidence by looking at virtually every fertility clinics' website to see what these websites say about the cultural norms present in the fertility industry. Despite going into the project knowing the concerns of other scholars, I was surprised by what we found.
Naming the beneficiary of my eggs in the event something happens to me is not like donating organs; my eggs could create a new life with a piece of me after I'm gone.
I have received a few sonogram images via email in the past year, with the following difference: The one my friends sent showed tiny lives growing inside of them. Mine shows an empty womb.
I'm not ready to be a mother, but I do not want to wake up one day and regret having played or let someone else play with my right to motherhood.
As women face the ticking of their biological clocks, they may turn to donor eggs or donor sperm to help them have children. For women (and men) in Washington State, the fertility industry is about to be transformed.