Freetown

Flooding has killed thousands of people in Asia and Africa during the month of August alone.
“The disaster is so serious that I myself feel broken,” said the country's vice president.
The stories about the decapitation of women's bodies are spilling, war is never private. Inspired by Susan Griffin's book
Nurses like Magdalene are in the hundreds, these frontline soldiers are yet to be given proper acknowledgement for service to their country. And Magdalene's beckons us not to forget.
As a practicing Mormon, I applaud the makers of this FREETOWN for bringing poignant questions to the screen in a powerful, faith-promoting way.
For those on the front line it's a difficult, and potentially deadly, task. The body of an Ebola victim can be highly contagious in the hours after death.
They are 5,250 miles apart, one in Asia, the other in Africa. But in each, huge piles of human skulls bear mute witness to the genocidal horrors of the last quarter of the 20th century when the world should already have learned better from the enormity of the Nazi Holocaust. Once the Chao Ponhea Yat High School, Pol Pot turned it into Security Prison 21 (S-21), where of the nearly 20,000 who passed through its satanic doors only a dozen survived. It was just one of scores of such hellholes where prisoners were beaten, tortured with electric shocks, burned with searing hot metal and water-boarded among other torments.
Since 2001, a group of amputees, almost all victims of the civil war, have met regularly on the beaches of Freetown, the
I come from a country where 1 in 23 women are at risk of not surviving during childbirth, where 1 baby dies every 46 minutes. A grim reality perhaps, but I also work on a project that chooses to focus on the possibilities of survival.
My Africa is is a collaborative effort to follow and share the stories of change-makers in 13 cities across sub-Saharan Africa.