online commenting

Gender-based harassment, always intersectional, is marked by the intent of the harasser to denigrate women on the basis of their sex, race, religion, gender, sexual identities or disabilities. It frequently uses violence that leverages existing real world threats that women navigate, like avoiding rape or intimate partner violence.
Not everybody asked questions in return, but I think we all knew that we were genuinely interested in what each other had
"I say we give him to ISIS" is, to me, a disturbing comment. One maybe thrown into the commentary as a joke to get a rise. It got one out of me.
Disagreeing with someone's argument is done through facts and analysis, which is completely necessary for healthy debate. Disagreeing by calling for violence is an attempt to silence a voice you think doesn't have a right to speak. There is a clear difference.
When Audrey isn't trying to change the way publishers and commenters engage online, she can be found curating content and
The Web is regularly hailed for its "openness" and that's where the confusion begins, since "open" in no way means "equal." While the Internet may create space for many voices, it also reflects and often amplifies real-world inequities in striking ways.
Religion will be positively affected by the Internet to the degree that we own what we think and approach one another via the web with all the same integrity we maintain in our interactions offline.
Over the course of my 22 years in journalism, I have been threatened numerous times. Sometimes the subjects of my stories didn't like having their misdeeds aired to the public, and so they lashed out. Sometimes, the people involved were just nuts.