prenup

A prenuptial agreement, or a prenup, is a written agreement made and executed before a couple marries outlining asset distribution
STARTER BELIEFS. The PreNuptual Agreement is like a terribly misunderstood child, with bad behavior on a few well publicized
My take on prenups is that they should meet the goals of both parties and also be as generous as possible within that framework. Too often an "off-the-shelf" prenup, generally submitted by the attorney of the more-moneyed spouse, dramatically departs from those aims.
So it's your wedding day and you're about to say those two little words. There's something niggling at the back of your mind that you've haven't got around to organizing... Food? Ordered and paid for. Presents for the in-laws? Check. Prenup? Ah. Oops.
Couples don't get married with the intention of breaking up. They enter a marriage with the intention of staying married and spending their lives together. With that being said, it is very difficult to spend time during an engagement discussing the "what if's" of divorce.
When I was growing up, I never imagined I'd end up a married person; frankly, I thought that by now, I'd either have died
Now, here it is, hundreds of years later: millions of fruitcakes are manufactured and sold in just the United States alone
Short answer: Yes! Long answer: A prenup, or prenuptial agreement if you're being fancy, is a contract between two people who are getting married.
I'm one of your biggest fans. I'm a Yankee, of course, but ever since my grandmother forced me to sit through Gone with the Wind when I was eight, I've had a deep respect for your determination and general pluck.
Sometimes the clearest and simplest laws need to be revisited because they produce unjust and unacceptable outcomes. This is certainly the case when it comes to determining custody of a companion animal upon the breakup of pet parents.
Don't let the word "prenup" scare you. Here, the true definition of a prenuptial agreement, plus seven reasons couples get them.
Times have changed. In the not-too-distant past, prenuptial agreements were not for everyone. The vast majority of people got married without one. The general consensus was that such agreements were only for the 'rich and famous.' In today's climate, people are seemingly more sophisticated than in the past.
When couples marry for the first time -- increasingly in their thirties -- they aren't saying "'til death do us part" any more, but making up their own conditional standard of commitment, like, "as long as we love."
The "temporary incompetence" of clients due to their emotional state and the attorneys' paternalistic attitude toward clients create a lack of understanding on the part of both the attorney and the client. This is the legal equivalent of a ship that hits rocks, runs aground, veers off course, and possibly sinks.
We all hope for the best when we get married, imagining that we will still be head over heels, 40 years down the line. And even though for some of us, inevitably that will not be true, we all benefit from believing it is.
Interestingly enough, even American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers members in the states that currently don't allow same-sex marriage have noted an increased number of consultations with same-sex couples to discuss cohabitation agreements and other legal strategies.
Considering the divorce rate, it was basic logic to protect not just your assets but yourself as a whole, from losing it all. However, now, as a newly engaged woman whose cynicism had been diluted by love, it seemed like such a negative way to look at my future with Olivier.
Growing up, Fugo knew that with the wedding cake and gown, a prenuptial agreement would be part of her marriage ritual. The