Richard Rodgers

"We have to be active, and as artists, we get to do that through art. This is when we are needed the most.”
So many musicals to see, I know; but the show, which remains in exquisite condition, now strikes a tone -- emotionally, not just musically -- that has been absent in recent renditions.
A word about the origins of the evening. Bill Rudman, a satellite radio host conceived this idea of bringing together the
When Encores! clicks, it renders the imperfect to perfection. Do I Hear A Waltz? is a famously imperfect Broadway musical that very few ever got to see. (It ran for roughly six months, after opening in March 1965, and rarely gets revived.)
Whether in fact or fiction, twins have always been a part of the cultural landscape. Actors Jon and Dan Heder are identical
I am fond of the 1943 movie, but it does have its problems. The opportunity to finally see the show at City Center's Encores! series last week, ostensibly as it was originally performed in 1940 on Broadway, filled me with anticipation. And trepidation.
His words caught the public fancy -- such phrases as "my huckleberry friend," "one for my baby and one more for the road," "hooray for Hollywood," and the immortal "my mamma done tol' me" are prime Mercer.
In a day and age when producers, directors and author's executors think nothing of imposing their so-called artistic vision on Broadway masterworks that were pretty good to begin with, it is heartening to see producers, directors and executors just do the show as written.
The obvious rightness of this family gathering does not preclude the fact that this is, so far as I know, the first time anyone has had the guts to tackle the Rodgers trio as one.
"Yes, because in all movies prior to this one, the devil has always been played by a white actor." Like a lot of you folks