yerba buena center for the arts

The 70-minute piece opens with the nine-member ensemble confined to a small square patch of stage illuminated by Lucy Carter. They rise and sink and appear to shed their skins in the eerie light, like bathers in the holy Ganges, to the elegiac sounds of a synthesized church organ from A Winged Victory for the Sullen.
This is a big year for Robert Dekkers. He has always juggled his roles as dancer, choreographer, teacher, and director of his own small but highly visible company with seemingly superhuman energy.
Shedding some of its listless lackluster, the summer show is becoming a testing ground for young artists, or those working in less sale-able and more experimental mediums, like installation and video.
Actors slip in and out of Tagalog, Visayan, Sinama, Bikolano, Spanish, Arabic and English -- praying in one language, cursing in the next, betraying their social standing with one, cementing a power dynamic with another.
Much of his work is ephemeral, expressly designed to be obliterated by wind, rain, snow or heat. Other structures, like his recent Culvert Cairn, a private commission in Marin County, will likely be around as long as Stonehenge.
Wayne McGregor's FAR, which came to the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco this past weekend, was reportedly conceived in collaboration with cognitive scientists at the University of California, San Diego. We'll take their word for it.
Post:Ballet's "Four Plays", suggests we are in for an evening of lighthearted, sexy escapades. But choreographer Robert Dekkers' dances are not just landscapes of streamlined bodies making pretty shapes, but also witty social commentary.
Greg Archer: Now, more than ever before, creative souls need to be uniting more, but I wonder what you think of the times
With all the concerts, readings, exhibits and shows going on, how do you decide what to fit into your all-too-brief weekend? Well, attending a performance by Robert Moses' Kin is like packing several artistic forays into one evening.
2012-03-15-20120314marcbamuthijoseph_breakspic12_PPthumb.jpg Today spoken word/hip hop theater artist Marc Bamuthi Joseph's red, black & GREEN: a blues opens at the Walker Art Center.
We gather as masses of people to observe a spectacle, whether it be a sports match, a rock concert, or a political rally
I can't help my skepticism for art exhibitions about the viewer. In so many cases, exhibitions with curatorial structures
The Hackers category casts its net wide enough to include some unexpected--and very welcome--cultural twists. Vitrines filled
But Yves Behar, the star designer who curated the show, is in no danger of losing his day job. Instead, "TechnoCRAFT," Behar's