Streamline
A guide to conquering peak TV

All The Movies Coming To Netflix This Week (Nov. 10-16)

The mystery-thriller "Earthquake Bird" debuts.
Riley Keough and Alicia Vikander in "Earthquake Bird"
Riley Keough and Alicia Vikander in "Earthquake Bird"

Netflix appears to be taking a bit of a pause on rolling out new Originals this week. Perhaps it’s because Disney+ just launched. Or because the third season of “The Crown” debuts on Sunday. Whatever the reason, Netflix has a lackluster week for new shows and movies.

“Earthquake Bird,” an adaptation of a 2001 mystery-thriller novel, is the most notable new movie, even though it has earned more mediocre reviews than good ones. The ridiculous name initially made me think this could be related to “Angry Birds,” but that doesn’t appear to be the case. (There have been lots of “bird” movies lately: Netflix had “High Flying Bird” earlier this year and “Bird Box” at the tail end of 2018. Perhaps the Netflix algorithm has discovered that people like “bird” titles.)

The movie, set in Tokyo, stars Jack Huston, Riley Keough and Alicia Vikander. You can read more about it below and watch the trailer.

Netflix also has a new Christmas movie this week with “Klaus.” The voice cast for this animated special includes Joan Cusack, Rashida Jones, Jason Schwartzman and J.K. Simmons. You can read the full list of arrivals below.

And if you want to stay informed of everything joining Netflix on a weekly basis, subscribe to the Streamline newsletter.

Notable Movie: “Earthquake Bird” (Netflix Film) ― Nov. 15

Riley Keough and Naoki Kobayashi in "<a href="https://www.netflix.com/title/80244457" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Earthquake Bird</a>"
Riley Keough and Naoki Kobayashi in "Earthquake Bird"

Details: This mystery-thriller is an adaptation of a 2001 novel called “The Earthquake Bird.” I couldn’t find an article about why Netflix dropped the “the” though.

The story follows a woman answering questions from Tokyo police officers about the disappearance of her female friend. This English protagonist has lived in Tokyo for many years and had been showing the now-missing friend around the city. A triangle of jealousy develops between the two women and the protagonist’s photographer boyfriend, perhaps spurring the disappearance.

Jack Huston, Riley Keough and Alicia Vikander star. Ridley Scott produced.

“Earthquake Bird” runs 1 hour, 47 minutes.

Read on: The opening to Glenn Kenny’s review of “Earthquake Bird” (the movie) in The New York Times focuses on providing context about the original novel. It also taught me a word I should have known by now:

British novelists do love their aptonyms. Dickens had Scrooge (and dozens of others), Martin Amis had Mary Lamb, and for her first novel, “The Earthquake Bird,” Susanna Jones had Lucy Fly. Lucy, for reasons illuminated in the unfolding of a missing-person mystery, zoomed from England to Japan as soon as she was legally able. But even in her new home she seems caged and eager to take wing.

Trailer:

The Full List Of Movies Joining Netflix

Nov. 11

  • “A Single Man”

Nov. 13

  • “Maradona in Mexico” (Netflix Documentary)

Nov. 15

  • “Earthquake Bird” (Netflix Film)
  • “Klaus” (Netflix Film)

Nov. 16

  • “Suffragette”