Now That The Olympics Are Over, Brazil Has A Lot Of Work To Do

Pyrotechnics erupt during the closing ceremony in the Maracana stadium at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil,
Pyrotechnics erupt during the closing ceremony in the Maracana stadium at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Sunday, Aug. 21, 2016. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

Despite the ongoing crisis in the country, Brazil managed to pull off beautiful opening and closing ceremonies for the Rio 2016 Olympic Games. The level of organization and creativity made us very proud.

But after two weeks of enthusiastically supporting our teams, I ask myself: What now?

To ready itself for the Olympics, Rio went through several radical changes. What was the impact of such change on the local population?

The city invested in bus lanes and light rail vehicles, with major renovation works concentrated in Barra da Tijuca and the Port Area, in the south region of Rio de Janeiro.

However, such renovations didn't reach the poorer population or the favelas. Development companies had other targets in mind.

In fact, in order to make room for Olympic infrastructure, poor families were evicted and relocated. Homeless people were also moved from sight.

How many of these Olympic heroes had government support and encouragement when they first started their careers?

A study conducted by the Brazilian higher education institution FGV shows that the Games positively impacted the economy of Rio de Janeiro, but that social inequality remained unchanged. Social inequality subjects thousands of people to degrading working conditions, as the Ministry of Labor's inspection of the Olympic Village showed. It also results in the sexual exploitation of adolescents from impoverished families.

Our police responded commendably to the American athletes' fabrication of a story about being robbed at gunpoint. We hope that the police force exhibits the same enthusiasm in cases concerning lesser-known people such Amarildo and Cláudia, who, like many others, are murdered despite their innocence and their daily struggle for a decent life.

It is true that Brazil has achieved excellent results and plenty of gold medals during Rio 2016, in sports such as volleyball, soccer, canoeing, pole vaulting, boxing, beach volleyball and judo.

But how many of these Olympic heroes had government support and encouragement when they first started their careers?

How many other athletes could have competed with foreign athletes if they had found stronger support?

This is a country that celebrates the refugee Olympic team, but is unable to offer migrants the necessary conditions for full integration.

This is a country that talks about environmental preservation, but is not even able to clean the Guanabara Bay.

Yes, the Olympic Games might have left a legacy. But as soon as we woke up on Monday, August 22, it was clear that there is still a lot to be done.

This post first appeared on HuffPost Brazil. It has been translated into English and edited for clarity.