china us relations

BEIJING -- China and the U.S. should free themselves from the "Thucydides trap" complex.
BEIJING -- Both countries demonstrate a common pattern of development different from that of the slowly growing West.
LONDON - As the South China Sea is a primary international shipping route, China will never impede lawful and legitimate freedom of navigation.
BEIJING -- Which is the real state of China-U.S. relations? Confrontation or cooperation? Or are both real?
The Paris climate accord, signed by 175 countries in April, was a high point of success for the United Nations. The U.N. has also managed to focus governments around the world on sustainable development goals. Yet, on the security side of the equation, for which the U.N. was principally founded, the record is largely one of failure. (continued)
In March 1946, Winston Churchill famously declared that an "iron curtain" had descended across the European continent, casting a decades-long chill between East and West known as the Cold War. A new chill is in the air once again as China and Russia seek to draw a new "digital curtain" across the world in a joint effort to thwart the Western web from penetrating their cultural space.(continued)
Washington still reaches too quickly for its gun over its purse to solve problems abroad. With the notable exception of sanctions, the U.S. still debates its largest geostrategic challenges in overwhelmingly politico-military terms. But this is the era of geoeconomic statecraft, and the contest for leadership in Asia is being waged in primarily economic terms.
The summit bore fruit with a joint China-U.S. communique, plus five separate action plans from different participants. In The Hague in 2014, President Xi put forward a Chinese approach to nuclear security for the first time, which provided an important and useful perspective to promote international nuclear security. At the 2016 summit, President Xi delivered a speech that fully demonstrated China's policies and initiatives.
On May 7, 1999, during NATO's intervention in Yugoslavia, U.S. warplanes accidentally dropped laser-guided bombs on the Chinese embassy in Belgrade.  The strike was meant to target a warehouse storing Yugoslav munitions, but the maps given to NATO were out-of-date.
In spite of China's enormous disadvantages, there will always be people thinking that China will one day want to lead the world. This perspective is erroneous.
BEIJING -- Debates are going on the two sides of the Pacific, in China and in the U.S., about the future world order. On the part of the U.S. the core issue is how to maintain its world dominance. Out of its natural fear of the traditional model of power transition, the U.S. is deeply concerned whether it can remain strong and whether the newly rising powers will compete for world dominance with the U.S.. So some suggest that the U.S. may need a new grand strategy.
America is still the world's only superpower, but China is gradually catching up. China's economy has become the second largest in the world, and the leadership is speaking with a louder voice in international affairs. And while historically China has eschewed building formal alliances with other countries, even that policy is slowly shifting: Beijing is courting new partners, including allies of Washington like President Park and others.
SYDNEY -- China today is a very powerful and ambitious country, led by a man who really is determined to build new model of great power relations in Asia to replace the regional order based on U.S. primacy. There are no low-risk, low-cost ways to respond to this challenge.
BEIJING -- During his visit, Xi repeatedly mentioned cybersecurity and the digital economy. His remarks on one hand indicated that taking advantage of information technologies to facilitate economic transformation, improving the government's governance capabilities and making information technologies benefit people are the Chinese government's firm priorities; on the other hand, they conveyed the Chinese leadership's idea that "national security is out of the question without cybersecurity."
In stark contrast to the warm welcome Pope Francis received from President Obama this week, Chinese President Xi Jinping arrives at the White House amid a period of heightened tensions, as China is in the midst of a financial meltdown and cyber-hacking headlines continue.
WASHINGTON — President Xi Jinping of China will make a landmark commitment on Friday to start a national program in 2017
SHANGHAI -- On the American West Coast, it will be a picture of entrepreneurial optimism characterized by growth and opportunities. Back East at the political center inside the Beltway, a chilly atmosphere with shrill rhetoric awaits Xi.
Here's what's at stake as the Chinese president visits the White House this week.