Conservation International

“Nature doesn’t need people. People need nature.”
There is no such thing as cheap food. Environmental and health costs are not reflected in market prices for food, but rather, absorbed by people who suffer from diet-related diseases and citizens who pay for environmental cleanup.
Planet Earth was a groundbreaking series, and I loved it because it opened all our eyes to the beauty and spectacle of our natural world. But it only told half the story.
Why should we care about lemurs? Well, aside from being delightful, beautiful creatures that are part of the mammalian order Primates of which we ourselves are members, they are also a major economic asset for a country historically plagued by poverty and political instability.
I attended my first SXSWeco, a gathering of a global community to explore, engage and co-create solutions for a sustainable world, this year. As I think back on the experience, it was a mix of unexpected events and people, which provided me with several takeaways that can teach us all some important lessons.
For too long, environmentalism and conservation have been focused on saving nature for its intrinsic value. We don't really talk much about people except almost as an afterthought. In some instances, we've even allowed our efforts to be framed as favoring nature at the expense of people.
Since most of the rain run-off ended up in the Pacific Ocean, there's little left to quench the thirsty empty reservoirs and therefore, unusable.
Madagascar is one of the world's most unusual countries -- an iconic "hotspot" in every sense of the word. It has also been the site of devastating poverty and environmental destruction, accelerated in recent years by an ineffective, corrupt government.
As new technologies let us explore ever deeper and more remote areas of our oceans, we are learning more and more about the amazing bounty of life they harbor.
CI and 83 partners have been meticulously gathering data on changes in biomass, biodiversity, species distribution and other indicators of ecosystem health. The data from this network offers decision makers an early warning system designed to identify potentially harmful changes arising within Earth's ecosystems.
(Story continues below) The little planthopper is thought to be partway through metamorphosis in this photo. It may not be
What we're seeing here is the perfect storm of extinction, poverty and radicalism. We're seeing the deterioration of societies and a massive threat to the stability of not only African nations but the entire world. A crucial step in changing this equation is to ensure that the ivory trade comes to an end.
We are talking about a far more serious question: How will we feed the world 20 years from now? Indeed, if we do not stop the systematic destruction of our ocean resources, we could have a serious seafood shortfall; this is on a collision course with simultaneous population growth.
Twenty years ago this month, the conservation community and the world suffered a tragic loss when a small plane flying out of the coastal city of Guayaquil, Ecuador crashed into a cloud-covered mountain.
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Conservation International visited Pool shortly after she rescued the creatures, and took some incredible photos of a sloth
Take a look at this adorable video of a baby sloth loving on a Conservation International cameraman, and some more shots
Take a look at some incredible photos of Pool's "slothified" sanctuary below. All photos and captions courtesy of Conservation