corrections corporation of america

The bill would make it easier for private prison corporations to help the federal government lock up migrant families.
From what we know about the plan, when Trump says "rebuild," he really means "privatize."
The New York Times has a lot of chutzpah. The Times, like most major newspapers in America, has been deeply complicit in
Last week was a turning point. The U.S. Department of Justice's (DOJ) announcement that it will wind down its use of private prisons is a major step in the struggle to end for-profit incarceration in America.
Why are asylum seekers being held in detention for months or years while they wait for the resolution of their case?
Private prison companies are roadblocks to meaningful criminal justice reform. Every taxpayer dollar that goes to their profits is a dollar not spent on improving conditions in jails and prisons or investing in alternatives to incarceration.
Despite the bizarre politics on display in Cleveland, sometimes knowing where someone stands on an issue is pretty straightforward. We can be sure about this: The private prison industry doesn't share our goal of ending mass incarceration.
ICE recently settled a lawsuit with the American Civil Liberties Union to provide better telephone access to immigrants detained
Her campaign says she wants to "end the era of mass incarceration."
Arrested, cuffed and booked, I was close enough to share the same breath as the lower depths of modern day America. Child molesters. Rapists. Murderers. Nazis. Gangbangers. Drug dealers. Thieves. Recidivists. Taxpayers. Voters. Citizens. People who were just like you and me.
Immigration attorneys have stepped in to provide legal services for the families. The Catholic Legal Immigration Network
If enough parents are willing to join the movement, keep their children home on test days, ignore the threats, the battle lines will be clear. School officials, local school boards, state legislators and members of Congress will be faced with a real school choice: Whose side are you on?
Introducing for-profit companies into America's criminal justice system has been a bad deal for governments across the country.
High recidivism rates mean more people behind bars, and Corrections Corporation of America depends on more and more incarceration to make its billions. Since when do they actually want people to do well after they get out, instead of being sucked back into the system?
Taxpayers are paying thousands of dollars to send people to prisons when the fines are less than the cost of incarceration. Some counties even brag about the amount of money raised from fines, but they are using false math.
Over the past 20 years, the number of people locked up for-profit has increased by 1,664 percent, but the horrors of the industry have not been experienced evenly.
Why would prisons fully pursue important policies like educational programs intended to prevent recidivism? If such policies were effective and decreased the number of inmates in their prisons it would negatively impact their bottom line.
Our criminal justice system is not a business, and people who are incarcerated should not be treated as assets on a corporate ledger.
Coast-to-coast, governments are realizing that outsourcing corrections to for-profit corporations is a bad deal for taxpayers, and for public safety.