deforestation

COP26 was hailed as a last-gasp chance to halt the climate crisis before it destroys our way of life for good. Did it work?
At the COP26 summit, the president stressed the importance of preserving forests to fight climate change — but critics say his policies tell another story.
The South American nation has pledged to end “illegal deforestation” by 2028. It could do that by legalizing what is currently against the law.
Deforestation, biodiversity loss and carbon emissions are lower on land governed by Indigenous communities, says a new United Nations report.
The Cerrado is the most biologically rich savanna in the world and a huge carbon sink, but it’s being razed to produce soy and beef.
Experts are looking to artificial intelligence and citizen scientists to track and combat destruction of the rainforest.
In West Africa, rainfall has dropped, temperatures have risen and wildlife has dwindled in one of the most biodiverse forest habitats in the world. But there is a reason for hope.
This was supposed to be the big year for transforming the palm oil industry and ending its environmental toll.
Indigenous tribes are appealing to the U.N. to help stop deforestation and raids on tribal lands, which have both increased under President Jair Bolsonaro.
Hundreds of global corporations have promised to help limit deforestation. None of them is meeting that goal.
As the Amazon burns, other forests around the globe face similar threats.
The military will "act strongly" to control the wildfires, Brazil's President Jair Bolsonaro promised.
The threat to what some call “the lungs of the planet” has ignited a bitter dispute about who is to blame.
The blazes are roasting South America's biggest country just as far-right President Jair Bolsonaro is rolling back environmental and indigenous protections.
The rainforest is burning amid increasing deforestation by farmers and ranchers.
The country plans to plant a total of 4 billion trees by October as part of an effort to reverse decades of deforestation.
“We’ve gone through multiple rounds where Cargill executives promise to act and then fail to get anything done."
We eat it, clean our homes and bodies with it and even fuel our cars with it. But our insatiable demand for palm oil is wreaking havoc on the planet — and our climate.
“We’re the first generation to live in peace in Colombia, but we are destroying our most biodiverse ecosystem.”
Efforts to deal with the crisis are like “trying to put out a house fire with a teaspoon."