Idioms

"Swallowed like a postman's sock" is a lot more romantic than it sounds.
I've continued my research as a freelance quote historian to determine the origins of several famous phrases. Below lie the true story of behind the cliches.
Listen to him for more than a few minutes and you'll notice that he has a very odd verbal tic: He obsessively punctuates
There are gestures belonging to another time that we don't use anymore. There were ways of functioning on a daily basis that would seem foreign today. We relied on objects which are now obsolete. We all have our lists of nostalgia.
Hillary Clinton quoted the Chinese poem “A Trip to Mountain West Village” by Lu You at the Shanghai 2010 World Expo to celebrate
So, apple pie as the quintessential American product may be an apt metaphor after all -- it was brought here from foreign shores, was influenced by other cultures and immigration patterns, and spread throughout the world by global affairs.
As a parent and dog trainer I'm programmed to look at life from another's perspective, and this time my impulses took a refreshing turn. With idiom dictionaries in hand, I scrolled through and took a look at the origin and meanings of idioms that evolved from our relationship with dogs and cats. It's been a delightful romp!
If idioms are your cup of tea, then you're going to have a field day with this delightful YouTube video in which the origins
If your particular cat crosses the line, and drops a few unwanted biological nuggets into your milk and cereal, or licks one of your eyeballs while you're half asleep, you might want to remind your kitty that it wasn't always an Internet star.
Even when we're not talking about food, we're often talking about food. Food is so engrained in our everyday vernacular that we barely notice it. But where do these food clichés and food-related idioms come from?
After spending nearly half an hour using my computer to learn more about whack, I contacted several professional acquaintances, asking them where I should go to the find the definition of "whack." Every one of them said: "Look it up on the Internet."
Ever have to stifle laughter around your kid because you know you shouldn't be cracking up over something they've done but it's beyond funny?
It's ok, this is a safe place, you guys. We can all admit here, without fear of admonishment that we've used a few -- perhaps
Over the past few weeks, German vlogger Flula Borg has more than entertained us by explaining the American idioms that confuse