management style

I've never met a manager who intended to demoralize their staff. Many do. But that's not their intention. In talking with them or those who report to them, what surfaces are habits, attitudes, practices, and skill deficiencies that lead their employees to disrespect, disengage, and decide to leave them for more pleasant environments.
Over the years I've ended up hiring and training a lot of people in their first jobs as a manager, and I always tell them they have two responsibilities.
Do you supervise individuals that would describe themselves as an introvert? In many cases, we hold misconceptions about introversion, which can lead to ill-fated supervisory decisions. I'd like to point you in the right direction.
Many helicopter bosses feel the need to hover in order to monitor efficiency, or to keep things on track, especially if an employee has erred in the past. But most micromanagers do so out of a need for control that often has more to do with them than the performance of their employees.
Leadership is the desire and capacity to modify the reality around us with a specific purpose, for the people around us and with the people around us.
Which is the wiser, more reasonable, and, ultimately, more effective decision-maker? Manager A, who does his or her best to consider all the relevant facts, including any mitigating circumstances? Or Manager B, who adheres to a rigid "zero-tolerance" policy?
If Obama's core value is unity, Democrats should know better than to expect him to fight their partisan fights for them. While he may disappoint them, they can also learn to respect the fact that he's being true to himself.