Starting College

Do you know your college strategy? Applying to college without a plan for standing out is never recommended. Colleges want
Since a good bit of your life [and grade!] will rely on essay writing, you may as well hone your skills early so you can shock your professors and continue to improve your grade.
Colleges split hairs when it comes to who gets admitted and who doesn't. Fair or unfair, the smallest thing can keep a student from not being admitted even if their grades and test scores are pristine. If the student is aware of the common pitfalls, they can avoid them. Why give colleges a reason to deny you? Here are the five biggest mistakes students make and how to avoid them.
Applying to college may seem daunting, but the start of another school year presents an incredible opportunity for your high school student to demonstrate the value she will add to a college admissions officer and increase her odds of admission.
As I wrestle with this paradox, with this profound passage in our lives -- both hers and mine -- I reflect on four guideposts to help me navigate the terrain. I suggest these for anyone who has recently sent a child off: to college, the armed forces, or their first adult adventure.
Most of us couldn't have predicted that one day, so much of our lives would be public. Young adults growing up in the early days of social media hadn't yet learned that posting online is like carving in stone -- that photo of you and friends celebrating spring break is mighty hard to erase.
Major 🔑 alert: Know the magic of leaving your dorm door open.
If I could declare July, "National College Essay Topic Month," I would. Right now, there are millions of rising high school seniors wondering what they should write their college essay about. It's a nerve-wracking time for them, and it shows.
A year ago, a friend of mine whose child had just graduated from high school suggested I write an article about this big milestone. I thought about it and decided to wait. It would have been like writing a guidebook about Paris based on internet research, without actually going there and seeing the light, smelling the bread. A year later, my son has just graduated from high school. Let's just say I've seen the light. I assume that's why there are tears in my eyes all the time.
Make sure you find time to relax this summer but also remain productive, active and interested... exercise, read, visit campuses while traveling, keep a journal, develop a hobby and collaborate on something meaningful.
Students change, so colleges are instead looking for dynamic individuals that are open-minded, capable of learning, and able to contribute back to their community. These traits can be show at either a private or public school.
Apparently I raised a veal. And my calf is about to leave the crate. Got to teach my son how to do laundry. And how to cook.
our semesters ago I began my collegiate journey at the University of Maryland Baltimore County. I was fresh, excited and incredibly naïve. At the time, I figured college would be everything high school was not.
Think of academic study in college as an opportunity to refine a skillset.
Idyllic morning in DC. Azaleas in full flower. I sip coffee at the kitchen window, eying a robin as she builds her nest on a low branch outside. Her cheerful air of maternal anticipation is too much.
To the motherless in college or anywhere, really: You're dealing with a heavy load of shit each and every day; and I get how you feel. Just remember that you're never alone, and someone else out there is feeling the same way you are.
College is a fucking money sucker. The tuition is enough as is, and on top of that, you have to pay for every little thing you do--especially if you're like me and you go to school in the city. There are so many things we waste money on that we don't even realize.
Whether you decided to go to college 15 minutes or 15 hours from home, your relationship with your parents is going to change. So sometimes it can be hard to decipher what you should and should not tell your parental units.
Proceed with caution if you have not visited the college. If you have not had an opportunity to visit and still have time before the final decision, then make time. It's not a good idea to accept an offer of admission if you have not visited the college.