ya fiction

“The Da Vinci Code” is being adapted for teen readers, but they’d be better off sticking with the original.
Drawing from her own experience, she tells students that writing is like making movies on the biggest scale possible. You
“I just wanted to investigate what it would be like to be someone who wasn’t defined by the body they were in.”
There's nothing I love more than a strong YA heroine. Seeing young women in literature portrayed as confident and capable, not to mention fierce, is empowering in so many ways. Lucky for you, I've listed the newest and best 2015 YA book heroines.
Jacob arrested at the Canadian border with his 3-year-old “fiancée” Renesmee. #VeryRealisticYA — Andrew Shaffer (@andrewtshaffer
Snow Likes Ashes is the best book I've read so far in 2014. It's got it all -- epic travel, forbidden romance and wild, untamed magic. In fact, I loved the book so much, I chose it as the October selection for Uppercase, a YA book subscription box.
Kelley Armstrong has published twenty-one fantasy novels, thirteen of which have been part of her Women of the Otherworld series. Her novels blend suspense and the supernatural.
Pleasure begets pleasure. The unfettered enjoyment of YA fiction now experienced by both adults and teenagers -- age groups that used to be at odds -- has led to increased exchanges of ideas and recommendations, the revitalization of the Internet reading community.
Anna Godbersen is the bestselling author of The Luxe series and Bright Young Things. Her new novel, The Blonde, is her first foray into adult fiction and is a compulsively gripping read.
Her latest YA release, The Coldest Girl in Coldtown, is Black's first vampire tale. Before you say "not another vampire book," let me reassure you that this novel is not the average blood-sucking scene.
Trust me. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ The book's title refers to a harvest that occurs once every ten years when the Rephaim
Perhaps those of us who write about a dystopian future have more faith in people than we do in the wise application of technology.
When Stephen King came up with his first great idea, his debut novel Carrie, he paved the way for many of us YA authors through his realization that nothing fits supernatural phenomena quite like adolescence.
From animal attacks to anorexia, magic spells to mental illness, insomnia to insecurity, obsession to oversleeping, slander to sexual temptation, the saints have got your back, and are always there for you to talk to.
But I sullenly have to oblige. That's what our school gets for having a school paper run "by the people, for the people." You
The Irish lad relishes how being a writer gives her freedom to travel, to sleep in, and stay up late. In her spare time, (which
The prototypical YA (Young Adult, i.e., early teen) novel “The Catcher in the Rye” may have been written by the late, reclusive
From ghostly protagonists to long-dead foils, literature is full of characters whose lives are over before the story even begins - and whom, though we never actually have the pleasure of meeting them, capture our imaginations through flashback, memory, or post-humous narration.