POLITICS

Mike Huckabee On Backlash To Trump's Santa Call: He Didn't Boil The Girl’s Bunny

While discussing the president's phone call with a 7-year-old girl, Huckabee referenced the 1987 erotic thriller "Fatal Attraction," as you do.

Mike Huckabee made an unexpected comparison to the movie “Fatal Attraction” Wednesday while weighing in on the media response to President Donald Trump’s Christmas call with a 7-year-old girl where he questioned her belief in Santa Claus.

“What is wrong with people?” the former Arkansas governor said on “Fox & Friends,” telling the hosts that Trump “can’t catch a break.”

“It wasn’t like he was boiling the little girl’s bunny rabbit in a pot on the stove or something. He asked a simple question,” Huckabee said.

“You can never find a way that President Trump will make some of the people in the press happy,” he said. “It doesn’t matter what he does. If he didn’t make the call, if he didn’t talk to the little girl, they’d say that he was curled up in a fetal position in the White House and that he was unwilling to come out and talk to anybody.”

Trump’s call with the girl, Collman Lloyd, lit up social media after he asked her if she was “still a believer in Santa,” saying, “Because at 7, it’s marginal, right?” Critics called the remark insensitive and slammed Trump for it, leaving pundits like Huckabee to come to his defense.

It’s not clear why Huckabee was inspired to cite “Fatal Attraction,” Adrian Lyne’s 1987 thriller about a woman (Glenn Close) who at one point seeks revenge on her ex-lover (Michael Douglas) by boiling his daughter’s pet rabbit in a pot on the stove after he scorns her.

Earlier in Wednesday’s show, host Todd Piro also defended Trump, saying that his call wasn’t “perfectly artful” but asking: “At the end of the day, can we have just one day when we just have fun?”

“He literally can do no right, even when he does something that’s somewhat innocuous,” Piro said.

After making his reference to “Fatal Attraction,” Huckabee went on to say there’s “no balance in the media these days,” claiming journalism is no longer journalism but rather advocacy.

CONVERSATIONS