bike lanes

There's a national bike shortage as the U.S. embraces cycling during the pandemic. It's good for our health and the environment -- but there are some less obvious benefits too.
Experts call for better city planning that makes cycling and walking easier and safer for people of all ages.
With a bit more than a week to go before election day, I made the pilgrimage to Nevada to canvass for Hillary Clinton. This election, there is nothing more important that putting Clinton in the White House and putting to bed America's orange menace.
A crash that killed five cyclists in Michigan has activists calling for streets that are safe for everyone.
But there are other, mostly positive things happening in New York that other cities across the country would be well-served
Please go to the polls and vote against the Neighborhood Integrity Initiative next March. And let's make safe streets & transit
Streetfight is an inspiring read. The sort of book that should be read by every officeholder wondering how they will advance their agenda in the rough and tumble world of contemporary urban politics.
The so-called Dutch junction is spreading to American cities.
While riding his bike on that same strip of bike lane one afternoon last year, a friend of mine got "too close" for another
Future of Cities is a civic initiative that aims to reinvigorate the involvement of civic leaders in creating a vibrant, cutting edge future for Los Angeles. Given our size and enduring economic inequality, we are indeed a city that needs to better marry vision, leadership and results to fulfill L.A.'s ambitions and achieve our potential.
Dense downtowns, public transit and walkable streets attract young residents and have economic, environmental and health benefits.
The historically black church alleges the city is trying to run them out in the wake of gentrification.
Al Selvin knew a great city, train line, bike path, restaurant and musician when he saw it. I hope we will continue to make L.A. a city worthy of his blessed memory.
Changes in the way we think about mobility is continuing to happen in Los Angeles because the old models of moving people around the region are severely limited and are not doing the trick for a growing number of us.