Bill Bryson

5. 13 Little Blue Envelopes, Maureen Johnson Here’s one of those, how do you say, guilty pleasures. I first read this book
Washington saw his job as setting the standard for everyone who would follow him, a job he did exceedingly well. If most of his successors and wannabes couldn't and can't measure up to those stirring standards, shame on them, not him.
Twelve words in a Bill Bryson book changed my friend Ann's life. Ann was 34, living in her native England, and bored by her job as an office manager for a government contractor. Then she read Bryson's book.
Andrey: "We don't trust you." American negotiator: "You don't trust us?" American negotiator: "There are checks on the safeguards
Though often remote, the Appalachian Trail was a route like any other. Ordinary roads ran near it and intersected it as it wound its way around towns, over rivers and across forested valleys. What was to stop me from tracking the trail by . . . car?
The Appalachian Trail is back in the news these days. Some of us have indelible memories of our experiences on the trail. Here's my tale of tracing the entire length of it, years back, in, uh, a rented Geo Prizm.
Robert Redford and Nick Nolte co-star in the film "A Walk In the Woods," which is based on a book of the same name by Bill Bryson. It is an aimless film about two disparate men who team up to walk the Appalachian Trail, a trek of some seventeen hundred miles.
The movie adaptation of A Walk in the Woods is on solid footing with Bill Bryson's chronicle of the struggles, discomforts, and deprivations he endured -- and gratifications he derived -- as he explored the Appalachian Trail in the spring and summer of 1996. The book conveys the trepidations he experienced -- the perils encountered, and imagined.
Nick Nolte grabs this film and walks away with honors. Every second that he is on screen is memorable. A Walk in the Woods is a sensitive, delicate, seamless comedy. Not the guffawing laugh fest implied in its horrible trailer.
But the script returns time and again to the sit-com template: Look at these funny old guys struggling in the wilderness
Ever since I got into travel writing, I've been told to read the works of Joseph Conrad, Jack Kerouac, Edward Abbey, Bruce Chatwin, Paul Theroux, William Dalrymple, Bill Bryson, and other white men. While I learned a lot from their stories, I was also repeatedly left with questions about misogyny and racial insensitivity.
For week 47 of 52 books in 52 weeks I read Bill Bryson's One Summer: America, 1927. And for week 48 I read Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card.
Identical follows the story of two, wait for it, identical twin brothers. One is a successful politician. The other's a convict, serving time for having killed his girlfriend.
No one writes with an easier grace than Bill Bryson. He has the rare ability to take a single, seemingly inconsequential observation and weave it, work it, and knead it until you're hooked on the story.
"At Home" is one of the most delightful, incisive, exhaustively studied, and truly humorous histories I have ever read. The book is not new. It was published three years ago. And why I never got around to writing about it I'll never know.
Nothing happened, really. Just compounded disappointment in our social and economic welfare that got too heavy and broke
I picked it up because--as I've blogged about before--I'd read Bill Bryson's book At Home, which was fascinating but not
Shocked, Colbert asked: "How did you make more people in front of everybody else?" "You made more people in front of everybody
2009 has been a fantastic year for kids' picture books, and parents, you'll love them as much as your children do. There's