Organizational culture

“We always talk about diversity as a fact, but inclusion is a choice," says Sasan Goodarzi, the CEO of Intuit.
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The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission received over 33,000 race discrimination claims nationwide in 2012 and again in 2013, an average of 92 claims a day. It is estimated that black Americans lose over $120 billion in wages each year do to labor market discrimination.
Transparency promises to vanquish backroom chicanery, dispel fear and expunge the value of lying. Savvy organizations scheme to make transparency part of their game plan for transparency is the cornerstone of trust.
It is a choice to embrace an altered state, i.e. a transformation. Once you are successful with a transformation, your organization is equipped to replicate the success. Transformation provides a built-in learning opportunity for everyone in your organization, which makes the organization nimble and eager to take on new things.
For the organization at large, it is the chief executive who owns the culture. The larger the organization, the more cultures multiply. From department to department, cultures can be quite different, depending on the department leader. In any case, the leader of the organization ultimately owns the organizational culture.
Continue to build passion and company pride, because if you are not sure why you like your company how can you sell its products or services?
Most senior managers struggle with culture because it's so difficult to define. Even less tangible than a "soft" concept, culture is more like a cloud: You know it's there, but it's nearly impossible to grasp.