research and development

At places like Chop't, Sweetgreen and Just Salad, lunch is a luxury that only certain people can afford.
Once the unrivaled leader in cutting-edge research, the United States now risks ceding breakthroughs in batteries and cancer treatment to other countries.
Horizon 2020, the EU's largest Research and Innovation programme ever, with nearly €80 billion of funding available over 7 years (2014 to 2020) - in addition to the private investment that this money will attract- promises more breakthroughs, discoveries and world-firsts by taking great ideas from the lab to the market and helping Europeans to explore their creativity and ingenuity.
At our second bargaining session this Thursday, the University has promised to make proposals - especially ones that will
Geographical and political barriers prevent Africans from working together. For instance, when Bonfoh organised a meeting
Of course, high-growth status can be taxing in other ways--the obvious areas are people, culture, systems, operations, and
There are increasing signs of coherence in developing scientific strategies across the continent. The first comprehensive
Policymakers should reject the false choice between public-sector leadership and private-sector leadership. America leads the world because its system maximizes the strengths of both.
Readers of this blog are aware that I am enthusiastic about the EDGAR definitions of "strong" and "moderate" evidence of effectiveness for educational programs. However, EDGAR also has two categories below "moderate."
Over the course of my career, I've written a lot of proposals. I've also reviewed a lot, and mostly, I've seen many funded projects crash and burn, or produce a scholarly article or two that are never heard of again.
As always, change is difficult but sometimes necessary. When it comes to the manufacturing sector and other traditional industries, embracing disruptive changes through new partnerships with start-ups may be the most exciting development in decades.
The next Administration will face a much greater challenge: Ensuring that Americans live longer lives in good health. If they don't, the cost to the nation will be astronomical, given heavy reliance on Medicare for older Americans and the sad fact that Americans younger than 50 are sicker than people in other wealthy nations.
Striving Readers was a serious, well-meaning attempt to solve a very important problem faced by far too many secondary students: difficulties with reading. But next time anyone thinks of doing something on that scale, I hope they will provide preference points in the application process for applicants who propose to use approaches with solid evidence of effectiveness.
Of all the Great Society programs, Head Start is perhaps the most popular. It provides center-based services to millions of very cute 3- and 4-year-olds, mostly children from disadvantaged families. If members of the public, educators, and policy makers know a single conclusion from educational research, it is that early-childhood programs have long-term positive impacts.
The Laura and John Arnold Foundation has announced it is setting up a new Evidence-Based Policy and Innovation division in Washington. Its purpose will be to encourage policy makers to utilize evidence and data in their decision making. But not just encourage. According to the press release, it wants evidence and data to be "the primary factor" in policy makers' decisions.
To reach our 1962 moment will require sustained investment in development, evaluation, and scale-up of proven programs in all subjects and grade levels, and a change of policies to encourage the use of proven programs. I hope our 1962 moment is coming soon. To bring it closer, we have a lot of work to do, in innovation, evaluation, policy, and practice.
At one of the most divisive political moments in our nation's history, in a piece of legislation that itself is controversial and has failed to be reauthorized despite numerous attempts over the past six years, a bipartisan amendment providing for education innovation and research sailed through a Senate committee.
Just as Jeb Bush and others in his party seem to be recognizing that research and development are among the few education-related activities that should remain at the federal level, the Republican-controlled Congress is proposing to eliminate the Investing in Innovation (i3) program and cut back other federal investments in research and development.
Senator John Cornyn, Rackspace, and CEO-General Council Kevin Fiur share their insights on a few impending policies that will liberate the entrepreneur... or facilitate idea stealing.
Hiding behind the price tag is budget gimmickry at best. If those tax provisions were spending programs, most would be automatically extended without the need to "pay for" them.