stress at work

Take a look at your office environment. There are probably a few unknown stressors hidden there somewhere. Here are ten hidden stressors you might not have noticed before. Tackling these problems can help to create a much calmer environment that's conducive to more efficient work.
Stress is an integral part of what makes work work, but it doesn't mean you're doomed to fall apart at the seams. I don't believe that. Just because stress levels are rising, doesn't mean you can't learn to swim.
When the person next to you yawns, chances are you're going to break off a tonsil-rattling exhale, too. And when your stressed-out colleague is demanding a meeting right now, the alarmed face quickly incites yours to mimic it. Now you're stressed, too.
Maybe it was a kind word from the CEO telling you your efforts were appreciated. Or the first time you had to apologize to your child. Your defining moments don't have to be huge, they can be quiet ones that only in looking back now you realize were key.
So why does compassion provide such a boost to employee well-being? One reason may be its impact on social connection. Research
There are plenty of daily workplace interpersonal interactions that contribute to stress, the largest area of workers compensation claims, but an area that is not considered frequently in regards to stress is the interaction between recruitment and candidates.
Dealing with having to pick up on someone else's poor planning is frustrating, and it's natural to feel this way. By recognizing and voicing your feelings, understanding different management styles, and reiterating your working preferences will help you deal with the situation more effectively.
Identifying the most pronounced sources of stress in your life is rarely difficult. Understanding how multiple sources of stress in your life act in concert to create your own individualized risk and resiliency profile is more complex.
Every job carries a certain -- even healthy -- level of stress. A little bit can motivate you, but a lot can wreak havoc on your health. And since you spend so much of your time at work, you're likely experiencing a lot of your stress there, too.
Now in the healing process, and as an advocate for managing work stress in a conscious way, I wanted to share a few lessons that I learned. First, work-life flexibility and acceptance are the greatest keys moving forward when sudden acute health care issues arise.
The survival instinct designed to give us tools to fight or flee has turned on us. Now that it is on inappropriately, this response can have the opposite effect. Instead of saving our lives, it can contribute to insomnia, depression, panic attacks, and a host of other health concerns.
Jan Bruce and Dr. Carol J. Scott join Alicia to talk about the health consequences of being too stressed out.
When management consultant Michael Stone interviewed executives across the U.S. to elicit their opinions about forgiveness at work, he found that it often brought up a sense of fear. But how do these fears match up with what we really know about the science of forgiveness?
The new study is the latest of many examining the relationship between women and stress. A 2012 study by the Families and