disconnecting

Lately, I've noticed something that is by no means a new occurrence, but is something that I think is becoming even more
If you're feeling like I did about social media- hooked, glued, fixated, and ultimately disappointed- an unsocial experiment might be worth a shot. Just one month can give time to refocus, recenter, and reconnect- all by disconnecting.
Sex comes and goes, but notifications are forever.
Here are five tips for creating stillness with ease this season and within your everyday life:
Only our internal experience and our emotions can truly guide us towards the answers to the big questions. But emotions get a bad wrap! We all know we have them. Yet, somehow, us humans get caught in a struggle to control or get rid of them.
In this hyper-connected, on-line all-the-time culture, it has never been more important to disengage and slow down. Adults have been doing it for years -- through yoga and the increasingly popular practice of mindfulness, which is generally described as the state of being attentive to the present moment.
"Nine to five." It might have meant something in your parents' day, but now it's just another awkward, outdated phrase, like "the bee's knees" or "I'm voting for Nixon." Our digital age has been sweet, but the price of permanent connection is steep.
Our ability to stay balanced in this day and age of exponential technology proliferation shall assist us in connecting to more things real and being present in the moment. The idea is not to become arcane or completely disconnect with the tech space but to strike equivalence in life.
As an experiment, I decided to get away from digital media for a while and see what that was like. Sort of like the National Day of Unplugging in March, which encourages people to unplug for 24 hours. But I did it for 184 consecutive days, with fewer people to keep me company.
Today's technology dependency is astounding. Most every income group, demographic and ethnicity has become accustomed to an "instant information" way of life. Sometimes, this is for the better. Many times, it's not.
Travel, adventure and being present enough to uncover the unexpected, can happen right down the street from home -- when I pack the right attitude, enough curiosity and some resourcefulness.
Our tech-tethered lives are making millions unwell. While that may be good news for Big Pharma, we in the sustainable wellness community have a better idea: try a digital detox -- learn to cut the cord and take your life back from tech.
I've had two experiences in the past few days that tied into some key life lessons that are useful in both our personal and professional lives (which as many people will tell you these days is one and the same).
Too often, we're plagued by "time poverty" -- the idea that there's not enough time to do all the work we need to do. The problem is, we stress out, and we burn out. But research is increasingly finding that the cure for "time poverty" isn't more time -- it's better using the time we have.
The six simple ways to look your best include a combination of fitness, nutrition and mindset strategies. These tips are meant to be easily implemented into your schedule during this crazy time of year.
Children between the ages of 8 and 18 spend, on average, more than 7.5 hours a day in front of a non-school-related screen. Given the busy lives children lead these days and the reality that there are only so many hours in a day, this statistic is almost unbelievable.
The email ban included not only emails amongst ourselves but also with clients. We set up auto-responders to let people know we weren't checking email and encouraged them to call us instead.