Gleevec

Recent memos allegedly leaked from the Colombian Embassy in Washington describe intense pressure by the pharmaceutical industry to discourage Colombia's efforts to half the local price of Novartis' Gleevec, one of the leading medications used to treat Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML).
Sen. Sherrod Brown wants answers from the Obama administration.
Public health organizations are asking GOP Sen. Orrin Hatch why he seems so protective of pharmaceutical profits in Colombia.
A leaked Colombian Embassy memo suggests the U.S. wants to preserve the high price of cancer drug Gleevec.
There is room for profit in the pharmaceutical industry. However, the amount of that profit should not cause suffering to patients, who are the pharmaceutical industry's consumer. As a country we must jointly stand together and insist on regulating the costs of these medications.
The word cure evokes powerful images of treatments ending, and a survivor stepping away from the carnage to begin a new life. It is the hope many cancer patients reach for. This is why OHSU sparked outrage this week when they began their One Down Campaign.
Your passion itself might take immense effort, but doing it will energize you. Especially for people just starting out, Janet said, "You're going to need patience."
In their Intellectual property case, the pharmaceutical company Novartis was asking to block a generic form of their cancer drug Gleevec from being created and sold by India. As a writer and also a person living with chronic myelogenous leukemia, I understand both sides of the battle.
The costs of protectionism can be large, as economists frequently point out when discussing 20 percent tariffs in steel. For some reason they become strangely silent when it comes to patent protection that raise the price of drugs by 1,000 percent.
India is actually at the forefront of providing affordable medicine to its citizens, which is a vast improvement over the healthcare system in the US.
India's Supreme Court on Monday rejected drug maker Novartis AG's attempt to patent a new version of a cancer drug in a landmark decision that healthcare activists say ensures poor patients around the world will get continued access to cheap versions of lifesaving medicines.
Thousands of clinical trials take place every day in this country and around the world as part of modern science's best attempt to find answers to medicine's most pressing questions.
Scientists know more than ever before about the mechanisms of cancer and how to stop its spread. Yet the new numbers we're seeing are victories in skirmishes, not battles.