walkability

1) Make walking a national priority 2) Design communities that make it safe and easy to walk for people of all ages and abilities
After reading The Well-Tempered City, and speaking at length with Rose, I emerged with excitement and optimism, because with
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How catching Pikachu could give you a taste of Parisian street life.
We must build strong partnerships between the public health and medical communities on one side and the planning and design worlds on the other to make sure this nationwide shift back to walking gets planned, designed, and built.
In case you missed the bulletin, Los Angeles is in the midst of a historic drought. We also have the nation's worst traffic and air pollution, and we're the least affordable city in the Lower 48 for millennials to buy a home.
Since settling here, I've adapted like I never lived in NYC. I get frustrated at (comparatively) dainty traffic jams on the Glenn Highway. Instead of ducking my head down, I make eye contact with people on the street.
The ebb and flow of nature, economic base and the passage of time are always ripe for observation. Below, take note of one walk's illustration of two towns, their edges and the spaces between.
The American people are some of the most creative and driven in the world and there's no reason solutions can't be found if we lay aside our differences and understand that we all want essentially the same thing: strong, safe, beautiful cities which we're proud to call home and pass on to the next generation better than we ourselves found them.
While some Main Streets seem well past their prime, others remain thriving to this day. Why? A lot of it has to do with the towns and cities in which they are located, of course; it's hard to have a well-functioning Main Street in a down-and-out community. But there are also elements of design and context that matter.