American imperialism

Today we must also remember how our leaders exploited 911 for political ends.
The other day I was cleaning chicken and stopped cold when I realized there were still feathers on the piece I was handling
Organizing Against Islamophobia: Reflection and Analysis to Strengthen Our Work Muslim communities and those being targeted
I feel blessed I see America through a more hopeful prism thanks to a gift presented to me at birth; my father's decision
These two seemingly unrelated scenarios have several things in common: A horribly wronged underdog. A supreme power responsible
Popular culture is another story with no Fagen references in films or TV shows. Nonetheless, Christopher T. Wood, an actor
The United States is a peculiar sort of empire. Americans have been in what might be called imperial denial since the Spanish-American War of 1898. The U.S. not only denies its imperial ambitions, but shrouds them in a curiously American brand of Christianized liberation theology.
Really, you didn't hear a peep about all those bases? If you don't get the way this country has garrisoned the planet, if you never notice its empire of bases, there is no way to grasp its imperial nature, which perhaps is the point.
Eastwood's Kyle an American hero? No doubt. But Eastwood's Kyle increasingly shows us that what has become equated with "American" is increasingly dangerous, naïve, and ignorant.
It's human nature to want to believe in the rightness of our own actions and intentions. But it's precisely human nature that is the problem; the fact that human evil is predictable does not make it excusable. We must be willing to consider ourselves culpable, and to put ourselves at risk.
If imperial has any meaning in the post-colonial 21st century, it certainly means that the (super)power in question has an active interest in attempting to control significant swathes of the planet. In fact, there has never been a power, no matter how "great," that has, in such a militarized way, tried to put its stamp of control on so much of Planet Earth.
Our ubiquitous social media are a game changer: having seen pictures of dead boys on a beach, we cannot un-see them.
The much-vaunted "liberal order" policed by the U.S. was a product of World War II and the Cold War. Germany and Japan had to be kept down, the Communist powers had to be contained, and the old countries of Europe had to learn to live with one another under unifying pan-national institutions. All of this was made possible by American money and military might. As a result, the Free World, in Western Europe and East Asia, became a US dependency. This cannot go on forever. Indeed, the arrangements are already fraying. But then comes the old imperial paradox. The longer others remain dependent on the U.S., the less capable they will be of taking care of their own affairs, including their security. And, like an authoritarian parent, the U.S. itself, despite its admonitions to its allies to pull their weight, is often loath to let go of its increasingly unruly dependents.
Throughout most of the Bush administration, opinion pollsters relentlessly tracked America's plummeting approval ratings across the planet.
Invasions don't come our way, but incursions do emanate from us and penetrate other nations on an astonishing scale -- a reality most Americans ignore or discount, abetted by their leaders.
The fact that the movement doesn't make demands of Wall Street -- or Washington, for that matter -- doesn't mean it doesn't have demands. It does, but they're not directed at Wall Street, or K Street, or Pennsylvania Avenue. They're directed at you.
Can Detroit be saved? What are the myths of green energy? What can we learn from the boggled reconstruction of Iraq? Are we going to share a future of biometric surveillance? Just how did white middle-class Americans start identifying themselves as outsiders?
Gaddafi's statements are not a mere propaganda attempt and he honestly believes in what he is saying.