curator

Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden's two-day-old baby hippo, born six weeks early, is hanging in there.  Her care team continues
I've returned a number of times to revisit the exhibit as, from an artist's perspective, it is fascinating to see works that are not finished offer insight into the artistic working process -- what the artist may have been thinking at that point in the painting.
Hans Ulrich Obrist is a curator and writer. He is the co-director of exhibitions and programs and the co-director of international projects at the Serpentine Galleries, London.
If you don't know that Susan Weiman is creative, all you have to do is look at her living room.
The exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art John Singer Sargent: Portraits of Artists and Friends is in its final days, ending October 4th. I was fortunate to be invited to give two talks during the exhibit examining Sargent's work from an artist perspective.
As Eden prepared to attend a conference on performance's intersection with visual art, MutualArt had the opportunity to ask her about her new position at DiverseWorks, her plans concerning funding and audience engagement and Katie Grinnan: Nocturnal Hologram, the first show she has curated for the space.
She speaks to us about the gallery, her curatorial goals and the concepts behind her recent and upcoming exhibitions at the gallery.
Two exhibits of my work, Oil and Water and Re/Viewing the American Landscape are currently on view at Blue Water Fine Arts in Port Clyde, Maine. I've been spending summers painting in Maine for close to forty years and exhibiting there for over thirty.
In this conversation, Maura Reilly talks to us about a recent ARTnews Special Issue on Women in the Art World that she has recently co-edited, her recent book project and her goals as the Chief Curator at the National Academy Museum, which she joined last month.
To Hide To Show is a group exhibition at MAMA, one of the newest contemporary art galleries taking Los Angeles by storm. The exhibition title is derived from the loose English translation of a contemporary French social anthropological study entitled "Montrer / Occulter."
The Museum and Library of The Hispanic Society of America is perhaps the least known of New York City museums, yet it has an extraordinary collection. I recently spent a delightful afternoon at the museum, which reflects the vision of Archer Milton Huntington to establish an institution dedicated to the celebration of Hispanic culture.
As I walked up the familiar steps and entrance everything seemed as it had been during my time as a student. The inside, however, was quite different and the courtyard was bathed in light, still surrounded by some familiar artwork.
As the Executive Director of a non-profit dedicated to creating a platform for women in the arts, I am always interested in hearing the experiences and insights of peers who are working toward similar goals.
For Eleven Madison Park, Chef Humm selected classic Miles Davis prints ("so cool, fresh, innovative and collaborative"), while the more raucous Rolling Stones photos preside at NoMad, which he calls "our looser, louder sibling."
"You have to see it to believe it" indeed! Ripley's archivist Edward Meyer joins HuffPost Live and brings along some wacky items, including sculptures made from nail clippings and chewed gum, extreme clothing and dressed up cockroaches.
In geographical art-centric terms, this sculpture could represent the cultural hub of Los Angeles at the center, with Las Vegas and other surrounding cities caught in its gravitational pull.
The uniting of the worlds of visual art and music is a trend that is getting a boost from a major new exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art, focusing on the composer John Cage and his monumental -- and some would say notorious -- work, titled 4'33".
The conservator can talk about the nuts and bolts while I try and figure out what was going on in the artist's head and eye. In this case, what did Homer see, how did he chose to paint it, why that and how did he execute it.
It is still not too late to see Maine Sublime: Frederic Church's Landscapes of Mount Desert and Mount Katahdin -- a gem of a small exhibit which closes October 27th
Marvette Pérez Garcia left a body of work that will not only be treasured for its significance, but also a legacy that promises to have continuous impact.