black music

If we have forgotten who we are, let's allow these moments in music to remind us. Reaching back into the crates, we are reminded
Before Beyoncé's ode of unapologetically standing firm, unapologetically being proud, hot sauce in her bag, and more importantly not being controlled by long centuries of negative portrayals and ideologies that have been systematically pushed concerning Black people, there was Lish
Although the shock and disbelief was instant, the lingering effect resembles that of an actual family member. I was a fan of his music and admired his talents, but I can't help think of the meaningful times that our career paths crossed and complimented each other dating all the way back to 1978.
An African-American woman releases a #1 rock album, Queen Latifah totally dominates the screen with her performance as the great blues singer Bessie Smith, and Alicia Keys raises $25,000,000 at her annual Black Ball for AIDS research. Who does that???
Even if we can't always relate to their music, don't understand what they're doing on social media, or think they push the envelope a little too much, let's embrace the next generation and take time to listen to what they have say.
Black music is the core of American music and the foundation of all popular music. But does it get enough recognition or acknowledgement -- more than just a month of appreciation and reflection?
After seeing Beyoncé fumble and falter her way through Mahalia Jackson's classic, "Precious Lord, Take My Hand," it can now be argued that artists aren't merely tossing about their faux manes, they're also throwing around their supposed professional clout.
Saturday Night Live became relevant again for about five minutes during Episode 13 of its 40th season. But it wasn't the writers or the cast that did it. It was D'Angelo.
You won't ever find James Chance out of his suit, neckwear or pompadour. And what may read a bit antsy on the outside is the opposite on the inside, for James is focused within the realm of his radical energy.
Questlove has grown weary of artists at the top of the hip-hop hierarchy making art that mostly celebrates being at the top of the hip-hop hierarchy -- meaningless, cynical stuff created and packaged to appeal to the masses.
In the world of early-20th-century African-American music and people obsessed by it, who can appear from one angle like a
Harlem's legendary Apollo Theater celebrates its 80th anniversary this year. It is bursting with music, theater and dance, and it looks marvelous, thanks to millions in renovations and upgrades -- an appropriate state for this iconic American cultural institution.
Sadly, for the most part, American music has gone the way of American cuisine. That is to say quality and originality have been replaced with fast food-type mediocrity.
As a result of that faith and hard work, Trey is being honored by The Recording Academy on June 25, 2013 for his contribution to music thus far.