Thomas Pynchon

The actor who no longer wants to act wrote a novel called “Bob Honey Who Just Do Stuff,” and somehow it gets worse from there.
The Internet, or more accurately, the Web 2.0 version of it, has been hailed as the "Great Equalizer," a title that public education once held. On the Internet, voices from all different ethnic, cultural, and economic backgrounds can come together.
If F. Scott Fitzgerald was alive today and writing, his income would be roughly half a million dollars a year. In his prime writing days, Fitzgerald was pulling in well over ten thousand dollars a year on short stories alone.
Inherent Vice squanders a strong start in an orgy of wheel-spinning. Perhaps Anderson is indulging himself with one of those lengthy jokes in which the punchline is that there's no punchline.
“Inherent Vice” is light, meandering and nearly airy compared to Anderson's last two quite serious films, “The Master” and
Making a film is the art of retroactive hypnotism. And there is no greater cinema hypnotist than Paul Thomas Anderson. It's rare to see a movie simultaneously this interesting and this good; this incoherent and this profound; this frustrating and this enjoyable.
There are films that make you want to run to the bookstore or, in reality, Amazon.com. Any Jane Austen or Dickens adaptation. Atonement. Requiem for a Dream perhaps. Then there is Paul Thomas Anderson's adaptation of Thomas Pynchon's Inherent Vice.
5. "Jackie Brown," directed by Quentin Tarantino (1997) 3. "Repo Man," directed by Alex Cox (1984) It also hails from a time
Whitney: I can definitely see your point, Matt, and can agree that it does shy away from any overt statements on the political
After months of not knowing much about "Inherent Vice" beyond its cast list and what's in Thomas Pynchon's 2009 novel, the