Lincoln Chafee

Weld was also aided by a schism in the Democratic Party between liberals who had supported former Massachusetts Attorney
Let's get on with the remaining 2016 best and worst awards. One warning: it's a very long column, so we encourage readers to pace themselves.
Wah, wah, wah! That's the collective whining of Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus and several GOP presidential candidates complaining of unfair, biased, mean-spirited debate moderators and their "gotcha" questions.
Hillary Clinton, once burdened with a profusion of image and credibility problems, has had a great many weights lifted off her shoulders this month. The Democratic presidential front-runner has defended her record at the State Department, dodged a serious challenge from Vice President Joe Biden and saw two of her primary opponents leave the race.
In fact, of the more than 30 Americans evacuated from Benghazi, only seven worked for the State Department. The rest were
This week, Joe Biden said no, Jim Webb and Lincoln Chafee said no more, while Hillary Clinton endured 11 hours of Benghazi hearings aimed more at finding attack ad soundbites than facts. Meanwhile, Paul Ryan threw his hat into the ring for Speaker, but only after telling his House-mates, "I cannot and will not give up my family time." Bravo! It's a big moment when a political leader says that when he's about to take a big job rather than as a euphemism for being fired. Now Ryan should work to make it possible for all Americans to experience more family time. In the past, Ryan has opposed paid family leave, allowing America to remain the world's only developed country without it. So, as he seeks to unify the GOP caucus, he should also fight for family-friendly policies at a time when the country really needs them.
US presidential candidates have been invited to participate in the first-ever US Presidential Candidates' Forum held abroad, focusing on foreign and defense policy issues.
Farewell to dreams of the metric system becoming a campaign issue.
The Washington consensus never changes. The mainstream media shills never cease their efforts to bully all seriousness -- all reality -- out of the voting process. And money and militarism silently, invisibly rule, no matter who wins.
There's a long way to go to the general election, and ample opportunity for candidates to up their chances by referring to the values. Whichever candidate ultimately wins, shared values will play a pivotal role.
Her strong showing in the debate began this trend, and if Biden's supporters put her comfortably over 50 percent in the Democratic race, the trend may become irreversible.
The Internet's prayers were answered when Larry David surprised audiences as Bernie Sanders on "Saturday Night Live." In
While I'm pleased that we are seeing at least Democrats having a substantive discussion on the use of force in Middle East conflicts, it's still not the serious and comprehensive discussion about US policy in the Middle East we so desperately need.
Because of the importance of the first debate of the season for Democrats, we're devoting the entire column today to scrutinizing the various talking points (good and bad) delivered by the candidates.
IN TODAY'S RADIO REPORT: Green News Report Special Coverage: Finally -- Climate change takes the spotlight, at least for
I've seen a lot of articles following the presidential debate, and to say it's one-sided is an understatement.